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  • How to Prevent Tooth Decay in Your Baby

    Baby teeth are important. If baby teeth are lost too early, the teeth that are left may move and not leave any room for adult teeth to come in. Also, if tooth decay is not prevented, it can be costly to treat, cause pain, and lead to life-threatening infections.

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  • How to Take Your Child's Temperature

    Your temperature (TEM-pruh-chur) is how warm or cold your body is. Normal temperature for a child is 98°F to 99°F or 37°C. The small circle (°) means “degrees.” Anything over 100.4°F or 38°C is a fever. (See “Words to Know” for “F” and “C.”)

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  • Imaging Tests: A Look Inside Your Child's Body

    If your pediatrician isn't sure what the cause of your child's illness or injury is, imaging tests may be needed. Imaging tests are used to “look” inside the body. They can help diagnose injuries and illnesses from broken bones to cancer. Some tests can even find problems before symptoms appear.

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  • Immunizations: What You Need To Know

    Immunizations have helped children stay healthy for more than 50 years. They are safe and they work. In fact, serious side effects are no more common than those from other types of medication. Vaccinations have reduced the number of infections from vaccine-preventable diseases by more than 90%! Yet many

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  • Important Information for Teens Who Get Headaches

    A lot of teens do. In fact, 50% to 75% of all teens report having at least one headache per month!

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  • Inhaled and Intranasal Corticosteroids and Your Child

    If your child has asthma or allergic rhinitis (hay fever), your pediatrician may prescribe a corticosteroid, also commonly referred to as a steroid. These medicines are the best available to decrease the swelling and irritation (inflammation) that occurs with persistent asthma or allergy. They are not

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  • Know the Facts About HIV and AIDS

    HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is a virus that can lead to AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). While there is no cure for HIV, early diagnosis and treatment are very effective at keeping people healthy. In addition, there are things you can do to prevent getting HIV. Read on to learn more

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  • Lactose Intolerance and Your Child

    After drinking milk or eating ice cream, does your child have stomach cramps or get diarrhea? If so, your child may have lactose intolerance.

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  • Lyme Disease

    Lyme disease is an important public health problem in some areas of the United States. Since its discovery in Lyme, CT, in 1975, thousands of cases of the disease have been reported across the United States and around the world. By knowing more about the disease and how to prevent it, you can help keep

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  • MMR (Measles, Mumps & Rubella) Vaccine: What You Need to Know (VIS)

    Measles, mumps, and rubella are serious diseases. Before vaccines they were very common, especially among children.

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  • MMRV (Measles, Mumps, Rubella, and Varicella) Vaccine (VIS)

    Measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella are viral diseases that can have serious consequences. Before vaccines, these diseases were very common in the United States, especially among children. They are still common in many parts of the world.

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  • Medicine and the Media: How to Make Sense of the Messages

    Your child is sick or hurt and the first thought on your mind is, “How can I make my child better?” That's natural. No parent wants his or her child to suffer. So how do you decide what medicines to give or treatments to try?

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  • Meningococcal Disease: Information for Teens and College Students

    Certain teens and young adults have a higher risk of getting meningococcal disease. College students, especially freshmen who live in dorms and military recruits, are at an increased risk compared with others in this age group. It's important to know how to protect yourself because meningococcal disease

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  • Middle Ear Fluid and Your Child

    The middle ear is the space behind the eardrum that is usually filled with air. When a child has middle ear fluid (otitis media with effusion), it means that a watery or mucus-like fluid has collected in the middle ear. Otitis media means middle ear inflammation, and effusion means fluid.

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  • Minor Head Injuries in Children

    Almost all children bump their heads every now and then. While these injuries can be upsetting, most head injuries are minor and do not cause serious problems. In very rare cases, problems can occur after a minor bump on the head. This publication was written by the American Academy of Pediatrics to

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  • Nursemaid's Elbow

    A pulled elbow (also known as nursemaid’s elbow) is a common, painful injury generally among children under four years old but occasionally older. It occurs when the outer part of the elbow becomes dislocated or slips out of its joint.

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Email is only checked once a day. For sick appointments or urgent issues please call the office at (312)943-6964.

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1030 N Clark Street, Suite 400 Chicago, IL 60610

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Walk-in sick hours are Monday - Saturday from 8:30 - 11:30am.

Child & Adolescent Health Associates

Monday:

8:30 am-5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:30 am-7:30 pm

Wednesday:

8:30 am-5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:30 am-7:30 pm

Friday:

8:30 am-5:00 pm

Saturday:

8:30 am-11:30 pm

Sunday:

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